One Day the Absurdity….

“One day the absurdity of the almost universal human belief in the slavery of other animals will be palpable. We shall then have discovered our souls and become worthy of sharing the planet with them.”

Often attributed, incorrectly, MLK, Jr., who promoted animal rights as well human rights. Author unknown.

Ten Ways Kids Can Help Save Animals

From Peta

Did you know that you can help animals no matter how old you are? Take Sydney and Alexandria, for example. They’re only 12, and they’ve been donating their time to helping animals for years! There are millions of dogs, cats, bunnies, and other animals in need of homes all over the U.S., and there are so many ways for you to help them.

Alexandria and Sydney love helping animals in need, like these puppies they helped foster!

Alexandria and Sydney love helping animals in need, like these puppies they helped foster!

Here are Sydney and Alexandria’s top 10 ways for kids like you to help animals in shelters:

1. Educate your friends and family.

Teach people how important it is to spay and neuter their dogs and cats. Around 70,000 puppies and kittens are born in the U.S. every day, and there are nowhere near enough good homes for all of them. Spaying and neutering can help end the homeless-animal crisis!

spay-cat-overpopulation-crisis

2. Ask for birthday donations.

For Sydney and Alexandria’s 10th birthday, they decided that there was nothing they wanted more than to make animals in need happy. They asked their friends and family to give them donations for their local animal shelter instead of birthday presents, and they raised enough money to buy warm beds for dogs so that they wouldn’t have to sleep on the cold concrete floor.

3. Raise money for animals.

Head over to a local business, like a grocery or hardware store, with your parents and ask if you can hold a bake sale in front of the building. Once you get the OK, hang signs up in your neighborhood a couple of weeks in advance letting people know when, where, and why you’ll be holding the bake sale. Be sure to make lots of yummy vegan treats and create signs showing the prices of the goodies.

Bake Sale (4th Graders from Charlotte, NC)

Ask your parents to post about your bake sale on Facebook to make sure that lots of people will know about it! During the sale, make sure you have some cash with you to give people change and plenty of napkins and bags so customers can take their treats to go. And of course, be sure to put out a donation collection can. (Sydney and Alexandria have held many bake sales for animals, and they say that people often give a donation without even taking a treat!)

4. Volunteer at your local animal shelter.

You may need your parents’ help with this one, since some shelters require that volunteers be a certain age unless theyre with a parent. If you find a shelter that will let you volunteer, you can walk dogs, clean up after the animals, refill water bowls, and give out toys and treats. Even just being there to pet cats and scratch dogs behind the ears will help them feel less lonely.

5. Adopt animals from shelters.

Dog-in-ShelterFreeImages.com/ vee bee

Instead of buying them from pet stores or breeders, be sure to always adopt animals from local shelters. Every year, more than 6 million animals are taken to shelters, and about half are euthanized because there aren’t enough good homes for them. If you have friends who are ready to take good care of a dog or cat (or any animal), urge them to adopt from a shelter instead of buying from a breeder or a pet store.

6. Set up a donation drive.

Ask your teacher or school principal if you can lead a donation drive at your school for an animal shelter. You and your parents can write a letter telling your school officials how you plan on doing it and why it’s important to collect items that animals in shelters need, like food, toys, leashes, beds, and blankets. You can ask your classmates and their friends and family to donate. And get a group of your own friends together to make colorful posters so you can spread the word about the donation drive!

7. Foster an animal.

Ask your parents to help you foster a homeless dog or cat. There are so many animals in need of a safe temporary place to hang out while they recover from an illness or injury, and some puppies and kittens need a quiet place to grow, away from the busy animal shelter. If you can commit your time and resources to fostering an animal, you’ll be helping two animals—the one you take into your home and another one who will get a place in the shelter.

Boy-with-Kitten-CatFreeImages.com/ Aurelia Werneck

It can be hard to say goodbye to an animal you’ve been fostering once they’re adopted into a permanent home and no longer need you to take care of them. But the good news is that because of you, an animal got a second chance at life in a loving home, and that’s pretty awesome! Fostering an animal is a big commitment, so you’ll need to ask your parents to help while you’re at school. With their mom’s help, Sydney and Alexandria have fostered more than 25 animals. If they can do it, so can you!

8. Speak up.

When you see animals in trouble, try to help them. If you see a dog chained to a tree every day when you walk home from school, ask your parents to call your local animal control officers and tell them why you’re worried about the situation. If you ever see kids being mean to stray cats (or anyone hurting any animals) stand up for them if you can. If it’s not safe for you to get involved, then ask a parent or trusted teacher to help.

9. Be kind to animals of all ages.

Older-DogFreeImages.com/ Annette Sparrow

Elderly dogs and cats may sleep most of the day and not want to play very much, but they need love and care, too. Sometimes, people are more interested in puppies and kittens because they’re more fun and playful, and older dogs and cats get ignored or neglected. Make it a point to give some extra attention to the older animals at your local shelter whenever you stop by!

10. Spread the word.

Ask your parents to post a photo or a video of a dog or cat who needs a home on their Instagram or Facebook pages. Many shelters have fliers you can download and hang in local coffee shops and other businesses. If not, just make your own! Along with pictures of the animals, include their age and gender, whether or not they get along with other animals and young kids, and any health problems they have. Also, don’t forget to put in the shelter’s contact information for anyone who is interested in adopting. All it takes is one kind person to see your flier and decide to adopt!

Thank you for caring!

Link to help Ukraine pets abandoned from Putin’s war

https://donate.hsi.org/page/36521/donate/1?ea.tracking.id=website_iarf_arrt_2022_ukraine_rst

Humane Society International is on the ground providing direct care of animals in dire need in Ukraine. Please consider giving even a small donation

Even a small donation will help HSI’s work on the ground with the animals of Ukraine

50 Ways To Help Animals

from Humane Society of United States

All of us can make a difference for animals in our everyday lives, whether it’s by adopting a pet, choosing products not tested on animals, eating a humane diet or engaging your community in animal protection issues. With so many widespread problems facing animals, it takes all of our collective efforts to confront these cruelties and change things for the better.

Here are 50 ideas for ways you can help animals in your community and across the country. Please share this list with any of your friends and family members who are also interested in advocating for animal protection.

Support our campaigns and programs

Connect with us

Woman holding dog and cell phone

Rasulov/Shutterstock

1. Sign up for email alerts to get the latest news and quick, simple actions to help animals straight to your inbox.

2. Sign up to receive text message alerts to do the same right from your cell phone.

3. Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

4. Share our videos on your website, blog or social networking page.

5. Subscribe to our blog for the latest animal news.

6. Attend Animal Care Expo (location varies), Taking Action for Animals in  Washington, D.C., or one of our many other events.

Be an advocate and spread the word

7. Write letters to the editor on our issues.

8. Ask your local radio and television stations to air Shelter Pet Project PSAs.

9. Post flyers and spread the word about our puppy mill and animal fighting rewards.

10. Distribute flyers at events and stores.

11. Encourage radio and television talk shows to discuss animal issues.

12. Sponsor a “Stop Puppy Mills” billboard in your community.

Portrait of a chicken in the grass

Burroblando/iStock.com

13. Ask your local restaurants and grocery stores to switch to cage-free eggs and to protect seals by boycotting Canadian seafood.

14. Join us in applauding pet stores that have taken a stand against puppy mills—support the more than 1,000 stores that have joined our Puppy-Friendly Pet Stores initiative. Encourage local stores that do sell puppies to stop.

15. Organize a World Spay Day event in your community.

16. Arrange coffee or lunch dates to introduce our fights to people who care about animals.

17. Work to get your local universities or your child’s schools to participate in Meatless Mondays or add vegetarian options to their menu.

18. Book and sponsor our subject matter experts for lectures at schools and universities—contact us if you’re interested!

19. Sponsor a local classroom and recommend our Nose-to-Tail program for elementary students or a young animal lover you may know.

Raise funds for our work

20. See how you can raise funds for animals at MyHumane.

21. Make a special one-time gift or support all animals all year round with an automatic monthly gift.

22. Make a memorial gift in honor of a friend or animal companion or give gift memberships to friends or family members.

23. Host a house party and have an executive or subject matter expert speak to your guests.

24. Ensure the HSUS is eligible for giving programs at your workplace and explore matching gifts from your employer. 

25. Donate your used vehicle to benefit the HSUS.

Dog sitting next to an old car

Meredith Lee/The HSUS

26. Include the HSUS as a beneficiary in your will.

27. Shop our Amazon storefront for branded apparel that lets you wear your support on your sleeve.

28. Purchase pet health insurance from Petplan and receive a 5% discount—and with each completed application, Petplan will make a $20 donation to our Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association’s Rural Area Veterinary Services program. Use code HSUS20.

29. Purchase or renew a subscription to All Animals magazine.

30. Order personal checks and create custom gifts from Zazzle.

31. Shop with our other corporate supporters and help animals with every purchase—coffee, flowers, wine, jewelry, and more.

32. Check out what people are selling to benefit us when you shop on eBay.

What you can do on your own

Help animals in your everyday life

White rabbit in the grass

mustafagull/iStock.com

33. Purchase cruelty-free cosmetics and household products.

34. Participate in Meatless Mondays and find delicious plant-based recipes for your next meal.

35. Adopt a pet from a local animal shelter or rescue group.

36. Support fur-free fashion by consulting the HSUS’s humane shopping guide.

37. Encourage your office to implement dog-friendly policies. Our book, Dogs at Work: A Practical Guide to Creating Dog-Friendly Workplaces, provides step-by-step advice.

38. Turn your outdoor space into a backyard sanctuary and find humane ways to coexist with wildlife.  

39. ID your animals and encourage others to do the same—and keep your cats safe indoors.

40. Prepare a disaster plan for your animals.

41. Learn what legislation is now pending in Congress and how you can help.

Get involved in your community

42. Help feral cats in your neighborhood with our Trap-Neuter-Return resources.

Deer fawn in the grass near some flowers

Ken Canning/iStock.com

43. Encourage your local officials to find long-lasting, nonlethal solutions to conflicts with wildlife such as bats, coyotes, deer and more.

44. Provide for your animals’ future in case you can’t care for them.

45. Participate in Animal Rescue Team training and sign up to help animals in crisis.

46. Attend Humane Lobby Day for the opportunity to talk to state legislators about passing laws that protect animals.

47. Develop humane outreach programs in your community.

48. Determine which elected officials represent you at local, state, and federal levels. Attend lawmakers’ town meetings to urge them to support our fights.

49. Work for the passage of local ordinances in your community, for example, to protect chained dogs or improve the lives of dogs in puppy mills.

50. Volunteer!

A Perspective on How Animals Feel

An excerpt from Martin Marten by Brian Doyle (an excellent book by any account):

Background: Martin is a marten living in the wilds of Mt. Hood, Oregon. Some of the book is written from the perspective of the marten, some from the perspective of the main human character, and some from the omniscient narrator’s perspective. In this excerpt, the young marten (Martin) and his sister are growing adolescents and nearing the time when they leave home:

“As July lengthened, Martin and his sister and their mother spent less time together; this was usual and natural and normal, the way of their species for millions of years, but Martin and his sister felt their mother’s attention waning, one bright grain less per day, with some deep sense of. . . what? Sadness, regret, loss, nostalgia? We don’t have good words yet for what animals feel; we hardly have more than wholly inadequate labels for our own tumultuous and complex emotions and senses. It’s wrong to say that animals do not feel what we feel; indeed they may feel far more than we do and in far different emotional shades. Given that their senses are often a hundred times more perceptive than ours, could not their emotional equipment be similarly vast?”

This Domestic Violence Awareness Month, survivors of domestic violence need your help

Nearly 50% of pet owning women will delay leaving an abusive home due to fear for the lives of their pets. Victims shouldn’t have to make the terrible choice between leaving to save themselves and their children, and leaving their pets behind with an abusive partner. The solution? Create safe spaces where domestic violence victims, their children, and their pets can all find safety together.

Double your impact. Right now, your gift to save pets in need from abuse will be matched, dollar-for-dollar, up to $20,000.

That’s where Greater Good Charities’ Rescue Rebuild program comes in. We’re re-imagining shelters for women who are victims of abuse. This October, for Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the team is headed to a domestic violence shelter in Oklahoma to renovate and transform it to properly accommodate women and their pets. We’ll work to convert a pole barn into an animal space, which will include six indoor kennels, pet visitation rooms, a free-roaming cat room, a play yard and more!

Together we can change the lives of women across the country by allowing them to bring their furry companions with them during this traumatic time.

Your donation today helps make this project possible. Right now, your gift will be matched, dollar for dollar, up to $20,000 by a generous Rescue Rebuild supporter! 

From https://theanimalrescuesite.greatergood.com/clicktogive/ars/home

A new ‘leash’ on life: Government program will train dogs for veterans with PTSD

From NBC News – As many as 20 veterans out of 100 from the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts have PTSD, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Becca Stephens comforting — and being comforted by — her service dog, Bobbi.
Becca Stephens comforting — and being comforted by — her service dog, Bobbi.K9s for Warriors

This month, Congress passed a bipartisan bill — the Puppies Assisting Wounded Servicemembers, or PAWS, for Veterans Therapy Act — to help connect veterans with their own service dogs. The bill is now headed to the desk of dog-lover President Joe Biden, who is expected to sign it.

By Patrick Martin

Bobbi keeps her soft brown eyes on Becca Stephens while patrolling the aisles of a grocery store, ever-vigilant of potential threats. She walks slightly behind, making sure no one can get the jump on the person she is there to protect.

Once the mission is over, Bobbi will head home, get a nice treat and play with her favorite toy, a bright orange traffic cone.

Bobbi is a service dog who has been by Stephens’ side for the last three years. The golden Labrador is specially trained to help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, like Stephens of Clearwater, Florida.

Stephens is a 36-year-old combat veteran who served in Basra, Iraq, from 2009 to 2010, working on radio equipment for her unit. She was diagnosed with PTSD in 2011.

“She just always has my back, and she knows” when Stephens needs reassurance, the veteran told NBC News.

Becca Stephens comforting — and being comforted by — her service dog, Bobbi.
Becca Stephens comforting — and being comforted by — her service dog, Bobbi.K9s for Warriors

This month, Congress passed a bipartisan bill — the Puppies Assisting Wounded Servicemembers, or PAWS, for Veterans Therapy Act — to help connect veterans with their own service dogs. The bill is now headed to the desk of dog-lover President Joe Biden, who is expected to sign it.

At that point, the Department of Veterans Affairs would work with organizations like K9s for Warriors, a Florida nonprofit organization that provides service dogs to veterans, which is where Stephens trained with Bobbi. The five-year program would take effect Jan. 1, 2022, said Rory Diamond, CEO of K9s for Warriors.

“We’re encouraged by the passage of this bill by both houses of Congress as an integral first step in the fight against veteran suicide,” Diamond said.

Of the more than 700 veterans who have been through the K9s for Warriors program, 72 percent had attempted suicide before being paired with their service dogs, Diamond said.

“We’re incredibly good at keeping them alive,” Diamond said. “So why wouldn’t the VA want to be part of that?”

Related

The program comes at a critical time. As many as 20 veterans out of 100 from the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts have PTSD, according to the VA. The pandemic has caused even more stress for veterans, with calls to the veterans crisis line surging more than 15 percent last year. And experts agree PTSD is underreported.

Veteran suicide continues to plague former service members. From 2005 to 2018, nearly 90,000 veterans have died by suicide, and the number continues to rise, according to the most recent report from the VA.

While Stephens may not have visible injuries, she is still wounded from the tolls of combat. After her deployment to Iraq, she said, she could never relax and always experienced a heightened sense of awareness. Medication prescribed after her PTSD diagnosis didn’t really help her.

“I was constantly having mood swings, you know, very palpable anger towards anything, extremely irritable, I would have nightmares, almost all the time,” she said.

Her PTSD ultimately led to a seven-year drug addiction, she said. Before meeting Bobbi, Stephens said, she contemplated suicide, going so far as to develop a pros and cons list.

“I was sitting on the edge of my bed thinking, you know, ‘This is it. I have nothing left at this point,'” she said.

Becca Stephens in her car with her service dog, Bobbi.
“You do all kinds of things that you’ve been avoiding,” said Becca Stephens, seen here in her car with her service dog, Bobbi.K9s for Warriors

Training a service dog to help someone with PTSD is an immersive program that helps the veteran and dog form a bond. The dog learns to notice signs of anxiety and how to soothe its owner.

“We found that, by and large, the most important and most commonly used task was to calm or comfort anxiety,” said Maggie O’Haire, an associate professor of human-animal interaction at Purdue University who works with K9s for Warriors.

Her research shows service dogs can help reduce the severity of PTSD in veterans. In a 2020 report released by the VA, participants paired with service dogs trained for PTSD had fewer suicidal behaviors and ideations within the first 18 months, compared to people with emotional support animals.

The tasks performed by these specially trained service dogs vary widely and are specific to the owner. One common task is called “lap,” a dog’s version of a weighted blanket.

“It’s basically deep pressure therapy for our warriors,” said Air Force veteran Christel Fleming, a trainer at K9s for Warriors. “We want the dog to get up, put its two front limbs across the warrior’s lap and to stay there calmly.”

The dog is taught not to jump up or lick the owner’s face.

A service dog.
“Instead of looking at the outside world and being really freaked out about what’s going on, they can look at their dog, scratch their dog, love on their dog and calm down,” said Air Force veteran Christel Fleming, a K9s for Warriors trainer.K9s for Warriors

“Instead of looking at the outside world and being really freaked out about what’s going on, [the veteran] can look at their dog, scratch their dog, love on their dog and calm down,” Fleming said.

The dogs aren’t intended to replace doctor visits or medication. In fact, O’Haire said the animals help their owners get out of the house for treatment appointments.

With Bobbi by her side, Stephens said, she is now three years sober and out in public all the time. She said the dog has given her a new “leash” on life.

“When I started to trust myself and respect myself and treat myself right, she could see that,” Stephens said.

Lost Your Cat?

It’s a myth that most cats will find their way home.

The most significant findings of a recent study were that a thorough physical search is likely to increase the chances of finding cats alive and most cats are found within a 500 m (1/3 mile) radius of their point of escape. Cats that were indoor-outdoor and allowed outside unsupervised traveled longer distances compared with indoor cats that were never allowed outside.

From: https://www.cats.org.uk/help-and-advice/lost-found-and-feral-cats/lost-a-cat and from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5789300/

Five things to help find your lost cat

  1. Shake a box of their favorite biscuits to entice them home.
  2. If your cat has a favorite toy, try leaving it in your garden.
  3. Cats have a strong sense of smell – leave out a regular blanket or bedding to encourage your cat out of hiding.
  4. You might find your moggy is more active at night, especially during hotter weather. Go out with a friend or family member when it is dark to call for your cat by name.
  5. Leave a bowl of water out and some food. A tasty treat such as tuna might be enough to bring your cat home.

Is my cat lost?

Not all cats are house cats. Some are inclined to wander, especially if there is fuss or food to be found elsewhere. It is normal for your cat to pop in and out throughout the day – especially if they have a taste for adventure. If your cat hasn’t returned by the time dinner time comes around, however, you might be worried that your cat is missing. Try not to panic. Cats can disappear for days at a time and return with no trouble, looking perfectly healthy. While you might be worried, they’re likely to stroll in and wonder what all the fuss is about. If they haven’t yet returned, give them a few hours before you make a plan of action.

I’ve lost my cat. What can I do?

If your pet still hasn’t returned home, there are a few simple things you can do to help find your missing cat. The first thing to do is to check your own home and garden. Cats love small cosy spaces and might be hiding in the unlikeliest of places – from cupboards to garden sheds. Check every room in your house, including any outbuildings and sheds too. Behind curtains, under duvets and even in household appliances like tumble dryers and washing machines. If you’re having building work completed, check under floorboards or any holes big enough for a cat to nestle into.

If you’re sure your cat isn’t at home, the next thing to do is to speak to your neighbors as well as any delivery people nearby. They might have seen your lost cat somewhere and can let you know of their whereabouts. Ask them to check their own sheds and outbuildings, as well as under any parked cars in the neighborhood. Remember to check homes on both sides of the road, as well as homes that have gardens that back on to yours. You could even provide neighbours with an up to date photo and your cat’s name, reminding them to keep an eye out.

Advertising on social media is a great way to get the message out that your cat is missing, particularly if you’re a member of a local Facebook community group. Post a clear photo of your cat, their name and your contact details.

It is also useful to keep a list of useful phone numbers pinned to a board in your kitchen. You can download our list below, complete with handy contact details.

How do I get my cat to come home?

If putting out the word about your missing cat hasn’t worked, there are some great tips and tricks to try at home. Cats are heavily reliant on scent and leaving out items that may entice them back to you is well worth an attempt. Things to try include the following:

  • Leave your cat’s favorite toy or some of their unwashed bedding in the garden
  • Leave an unwashed item of your clothing, which will have your scent on it
  • Place any used litter from your cat’s litter tray outside, or perhaps the contents of your hoover for a smell of home
  • Call out for your cat in the garden early in the morning or late at night, when everywhere is likely to be quieter
  • Shake a box of their favorite biscuits or treats
  • Keep calling your cat, leaving enough time for them to hear you and be led home

Lost your cat? Follow our checklist

If you’re beginning the search for a missing cat, download our checklist to tick off each action as you do it.

  • Search first. Check small spaces in your home – everywhere from cosy cupboards to garden sheds, garages and outbuildings
  • Ask your neighbors. They’ll need to check their property, sheds and garages too.
  • Is your cat microchipped? Talk to Petlog on 01296 737 600 or Identibase on 01904 487 600 to register your cat as missing
  • Speak to your local Cats Protection branch or centre to see if they’ve had a cat handed in to them. To find one in your area, visit our Find Us page and enter your postcode
  • Get in touch with animal shelters in your area. Visit catchat.org to find those local to you
  • Contact all vet practices in the area
  • Make and put up flyers with your cat’s photo and description to place around the local area – or post them through your neighbour’s letterboxes
  • Post a description of your cat on your Facebook page, as well as any local community Facebook groups

Download the checklist

Microchipping your cat

Microchipping your cat is the most effective way to ensure that they can be identified if they go missing, and keeping your details up to date can increase the likelihood of a happy reunion. If your lost cat is found and taken to a vet or animal welfare organisation, you’ll be contacted quickly.

Moved house or changed a phone number? You’ll need to let your microchipping company know so that your details that are on file can be amended.Find out more about microchipping your catDownload: Microchipping guide

You Can Make a Difference for Farm Animals by Choosing Certified Humane/Welfare Certified Meat Brands

The ASPCA has provided a list of food brands that have welfare certification, which represents more humane and transparent farming practices. Please consider helping to create a more humane world for farm animals by choosing certified humane or animal welfare certified products.

be kind!

Here are a few of the brands that are Certified Humane, Animal Welfare Certified, or Animal Welfare Approved:

CHICKEN: Aldi – Simply Nature Free Range Organic Chicken • Amazon/Whole Foods – 365 Everyday Value Chicken • Thrive Market – Free Range Chicken, Pasture Raised Chicken •

EGGS: Aldefer’s Eggs• Costco Kirkland Signature Organic Eggs • Nellie’s Free Range Eggs • Pete and Gerry’s Eggs

BEEF: Applegate – Organic Uncured Beef Hot Dog • Country Natural Beef – all products • Crane Dance Farm – app products • Eel River Organic Beef – all products • Niman Ranch – all products • Redger Farms – all products • Wellshire – sliced beef bacon • TruBeef – all products • White Oak Pastures – grass fed beef

PORK: North Country Smokehouse- various products certified • Newman Farms – all products • Joia Food Farm – all products • Goodnight Brothers – all natural product certified • DuBreton – various products certified

LAMB: Anderson Ranches – all products • White Oak Pastures – all products • Joia Food Farm – all products • Central Grazing Company

TURKEY: ButcherBox – ground turkey • Diestel Turkey – pasture raised whole turkey line • Great American Turkey Company – strips, sausages, cutlets • Koch’s Turkey – all products • White Oak Pastures – all products

For ASPCA’s full list:

What You Can To Combat Pet Overpopulation

Only 1 out of every 10 dogs born will find a permanent home. 25% of dogs that enter shelters are purebred. Estimates for homeless cats in the US range up to 70 million.

Every year, millions of cats and dogs are euthanized because shelters are too full and there are more pets than there are responsible homes for them. Until this issue is resolved, American Humane believes that all cats and dogs adopted from public or private animal care and control facilities should be spayed or neutered.

  1. If you are adding a pet to your family, please make sure the pet comes from a legitimate shelter, nonprofit rescue group or a responsible, humane breeder.
  2. Always spay and neuter your pets.
  3. Consider all the responsibilities and consequences of pet ownership before deciding to get a pet and always make a lifetime commitment to your pet.
  4. Educate your children, friends, family members and co-workers about pet overpopulation, adoption and the importance of spaying and neutering.

You can help stop generations of suffering. Have your female pet spayed and your male pet neutered. Don’t allow them to breed and add to the pet overpopulation problem. Many strays are lost pets that were not kept properly indoors or provided with identification.

Sources: American Humane, DoSomething.org